Measuring happiness: from fluctuating happiness to authentic—durable happiness, by Michaël Dambrun, Matthieu Ricard, et al, Frontiers in Personality Science and Individual Differences 2012

Published on November 27, 2012 In Articles about Science

Based on the theoretical model set down by Michaël Dambrun and Matthieu Ricard on the distinction between self-centeredness and selflessness, this study proposes findings on how a self-centered psychological functioning only produces fluctuating happiness while a selfless functioning leads to durable happiness.

International Journal of Social Psychology, Number 93

Published on November 27, 2012 In Articles about Science

A series of articles presenting scientific conclusions about subjects such as positive psychology, altruism, and happiness. This series includes an article by Michaël Dambrun and Matthieu Ricard on transcendence of the self and happiness. 

The benefits of meditating on impermanence

Published on November 27, 2012 In Articles about Buddhism

Even if you are extremely beautiful, you cannot seduce death. If you are very powerful, you cannot hope to influence death. Even being incredibly wealthy cannot buy a few minutes more life. At present we cannot bear the small discomfort caused by a prickly thorn or the heat of the sun. What about the anguish we have to face at the time of death...

Why do Buddhists venerate the Buddha?

Published on November 24, 2012 In Articles about Buddhism

The Buddha is not venerated because devotees see him as a God and worship him, but rather because he's the ultimate teacher, the embodiment of enlightenment. The Sanskrit word Buddha means ‟the awakened one,” he who has realized the truth. In Tibetan, the word by which it's translated, Sang-gyé, has two syllables, sang meaning that he has ‟diss...

Reincarnation is not the rebirth of a self

Published on November 24, 2012 In Articles about Buddhism

First of all, it's important to understand that what's called reincarnation in Buddhism has nothing to do with the transmigration of some ‟entity” like an autonomous "self". It's not a process of metempsychosis. As long as one thinks in terms of entities rather than function and continuity of experience, it's impossible to understand the Buddhi...